Translate: 

Adequate sleep, a healthy diet, mindfulness, and physical activity are the cornerstones of children’s overall health and key contributors to positive child health outcomes. Equally as important is the health of youth workers as they care for children, in a variety of settings. The resources listed include promising practices and strategies for youth workers to address unique challenges and develop effective coping mechanisms.

  • Burnout and Compassion Fatigue
  • Secondary Traumatic Stress
  • Wellness and Self-Care

Find the full list of resources here.

 

Literacy is related to listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Before a child even starts school, they are able to build foundational skills in literacy. These early skills, such as oral language, alphabet knowledge, phonological awareness, and letter writing, are connected to long-term school performance. Achieving reading proficiency by the end of third grade is a critical marker in a child’s educational development because by fourth-grade children are expected to use reading to learn other subjects

To learn more and read the Data Report, click here. 

The transferal of resources between generations contributes to a child’s family’s wealth and helps build their assets throughout their lifetimes.  

Our data report explores the factors impacting the wealth gap and provides actionable strategies to leverage the data for a more equitable future. 

Read the report here

 

Homelessness creates intense challenges and barriers for children and youth, which hinders their ability to find academic, social, and financial success. Children can exhibit various academic or social difficulties that result from the trauma of homelessness, mobility, and the lack of structural consistency and security.

To learn about students experiencing homelessness in Indiana, click here!

To read the appendix, click here.

We all know STEM is important, but do we know how important it will be moving forward?

Children must be able to grow, learn, adapt and thrive in a quickly evolving world. STEM is not only about economic prosperity, but also establishing good quality of life for our children.

Our STEM Spotlight, produced in collaboration with the Girl Scouts of Central Indiana, is a quick and easy way to digest STEM in relation to Hoosier youth.

Read the Spotlight here! 

 

Students laugh and talk.

For the thousands of Hoosier children in foster care, educational success is essential to reach their full potential. But research tells us that our foster youth face educational disparities from early education to postsecondary.

We can all help Indiana’s foster students thrive by working together, addressing systemic issues and providing equitable opportunities.

Our latest spotlight, developed in partnership with Foster Success, aims to support you in making a difference in the experiences and outcomes of our foster youth.

Read the spotlight to get the latest insights on this growing population of students.

Read the spotlight!

Social-emotional learning is a foundational approach to educating the whole child

This issue brief focuses on social-emotional learning (SEL) and how you can make SEL foundational to your work with Indiana’s youth.

SEL helps ensure students have the social, emotional, behavioral, and academic competence necessary for success in school and lifelong well-being.  This essential work focuses on educating the whole child and requires a cultural and mindset shift as well as a collective approach.

In this brief, you’ll find an overview of the Indiana Department of Education’s new Indiana Social-Emotional Competencies and the latest SEL research. Plus, you’ll learn how you can effectively implement SEL in your classroom, school and community.

Read the Brief! 

Children thrive when they are surrounded by stable, consistent and meaningful relationships with caring adults.

Research shows that a quality mentoring relationship can have a resoundingly positive impact on young people’s lives. Youth with quality mentoring experience better educational, vocational and psychosocial outcomes than their unmentored peers. For all its benefits, unfortunately, one in three young people will grow up without ever having a positive mentor.

Read the Issue! 

Child Reaching for Hamburger and Fries

Childhood obesity presents a critical and widespread issue for Indiana children.

One in three Hoosier children ages 10-17 are overweight or obese (33.9%). While childhood obesity presents a concern nationally, this issue is especially relevant in Indiana. Hoosier children are 14.9% more likely to be obese than their peers nationwide. This ranks Indiana as the 9th highest rate of childhood overweight and obesity. In comparison to all neighboring states, Indiana has the highest rate.

Read the Issue!

The well-being of mothers and infants determines the health of the next generation.

In the 2018 State of the State address, Governor Eric Holcomb set the goal for Indiana to become the best state in the Midwest for infant mortality rates by 2024, challenging us to work together to improve conditions for infants. The governor labeled our current infant mortality rate as “unacceptable.” In 2016, 623 Hoosier children died before their first birthday. Indiana ranks 41st nationally for infant mortality, with our babies being 24% more likely to die before their first birthday than infants nationally. Indiana has lagged behind the national average for the past two decades.

Read the Issue!