We want you to have access to great data.

This data and research source guide lists some of our favorite trusted and reliable sources that you can use in your work with Indiana’s kids.

In addition to links to each source, the guide indicates whether:

  • Data is available at national, state, county and/or more specific local levels.
  • Data is disaggregated by race, gender, place, income, and/or other related indicators.
  • Data is accessible through dashboards, interactive visualizations, downloadable reports and/or raw data.

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Hoosier youth are the hidden victims of the opioid epidemic. The statewide crisis has a negative impact on child well-being, families and communities. Hoosiers are more likely to die from a drug overdose than car crashes and gun homicides combined. In 2017, Indiana’s rate of fatal overdoses was 25.7 per 100,000. This is significantly above the national average of 22.4, ranking Indiana’s overdose death rate as the 15th highest in the nation.

  • In 2017, 1,138 Hoosiers died from an opioid overdose, a rate of 17.1 deaths per 100,000 Indiana residents.
  • In 2016, opioid overdose deaths were most common among white (89.8%), followed by black (8.9%) and all other Hoosiers (1.3%).
  • 83 out of the 92 Indiana counties had at least one non-fatal emergency department visit involving any opioid in 2017.

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Indiana ranks 48th for child abuse and neglect which puts children’s safety at risk and impacts future well-being across a lifetime.

Reporting

The Indiana Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline serves as the central reporting center for child maltreatment allegations.

  • The total number of calls made to the Indiana Child Abuse an dNeglect Hotline in 2018 was 203,602, an increase of 30.6% since 2012.
  • In 2018, the Indiana Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline handled 242,994 reports; this has increased by 36.9% since 2012.
  • Every adult in the state of Indiana is a mandatory reporter of child abuse and neglect. Any adult who has reason to believe that a child has been abused or neglected is required to call the Department of Child Services: 1-800-800-5556.

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Hoosier youth health is threatened by the harmful effects of tobacco use. Youth vaping is on the rise and is associated with a likelihood of increasing the use of both e-cigarettes and cigarettes in the future.

The use of any type of tobacco product is unsafe for young people. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease in the United States. All types of tobacco products are harmful and any exposure to tobacco smoke can cause immediate and long-term damage.

  • 3,700 Hoosier children under 18 become new daily smokers each year.
  • Nearly 9 out of 10 smokers start before age 18.
  • Youth are sensitive to nicotine addiction and feel dependence earlier than adults. Nicotine addiction prolongs tobacco use and leads to severe health consequences.
  • As the brain continues developing until age 25, adolescent use of e-cigarettes containing nicotine can harm the part of the brain responsible for mood, learning and impulse control.

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The homeless enrollment in Indiana public schools has increased by 34.2% since the 2010-11 school year.

Who Is Considered Homeless? Under the McKinney-Vento Act, schools are required to keep track of the number of children whom they know lack a fixed, regular, adequate nighttime residence. Students experiencing housing instability may be living in motels, trailer parks, campgrounds, transitional shelters, or sharing housing with others because of economic hardship.

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sad boy

The cumulative effect of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) has a lifelong impact on children. As the number of ACEs increases, there is a greater likelihood of negative wellbeing outcomes such as obesity, depression, and other chronic conditions throughout life.

What are ACEs? Adverse childhood experiences are stressful or traumatic events occurring in childhood and are used to assess the long-term impact of abuse and household dysfunction on later-life health.

  • Nearly half (47.3%) of Hoosier children have experienced one or more ACEs.
  • Indiana has a higher prevalence of children experiencing at least one ACE (47.3%) than half of our neighboring states: Illinois (39.7%), Michigan (46.2%), Ohio (49.5%), and Kentucky (53.1%).
  • Hoosier youth have a higher prevalence than their peers nationally in eight of out nine ACEs as measured by the National Survey of Children’s Health.

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Hoosier youth are significantly more likely to consider or attempt suicide than their peers nationally. Indiana faces significant disparities in youth suicide among vulnerable groups.

Youth Suicide Deaths:

  • In 2016, 57 Hoosier youth ages 19 and younger died by suicide. This represents an increase from 55 deaths in 2015 and 52 deaths in 2014.
  • Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for youth ages 15-24 and the 4th leading cause of death for youth ages 5-14.
  • 39% of Indiana’s youth suicide deaths are concentrated in 5 counties: Lake, Marion, Allen, Hendricks, and Porter.
  • 59 of Indiana’s 92 counties had zero youth suicide deaths in 2016.

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Person Smoking

Children’s health is threatened by maternal smoking, exposure to secondhand smoke, and teen tobacco use. An estimated 95% of adult smokers start smoking before the age of 21.

Maternal Smoking

  • Indiana ranks 35th for maternal smoking with 13.5% of expectant Hoosier mothers smoking while pregnant.
  • The rate of smoking while pregnant in Indiana (13.5%) is 69% higher than the national rate (8.0%).
  • Maternal smoking in Indiana has steadily decreased since 2008, when 18.5% of expectant mothers smoked.
  • Indiana has a higher maternal smoking rate than half of our neighboring states: Illinois (7%), Kentucky (20%), Michigan (12%), and Ohio (15%).

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