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According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation “Stepping Up for Kids” Policy Report, there has been an increase in the number of children living with extended family and close friends; 1 in 11 children lives in kinship care at some point before the age of 18. Kinship caregivers face multiple financial, health and social stresses of caregiving and there is an ever-growing need for support and education for kinship parents. 

This presentation will help attendees: 

  • learn the definition of kinship parenting; 
  • understand the various circumstances that can lead to a kinship placement;  
  • hear about the challenges and stigmas associated with kinship care; and  
  • learn about supportive resources available. 

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Speakers

Alice Smith, MS

Title: Extension Educator, Health and Human Sciences – Purdue Extension Jasper County

Alice Smith has been with Purdue Extension for eight years following a career teaching Consumer and Family Sciences. She has great interest in human development and currently teaches parenting and grand-parenting programs, coaches divorcing parents, and works with foster parents. As part of the local drug free coalition she has established a Family Fun Fair, a Child ID Project and a Senior Expo in Jasper County. She is currently coordinating a statewide program on social rejection.

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According to Child Trends, many children living in poverty have gaps in learning, knowledge and socio-emotional development that begin as early as infancy and get progressively wider over time. The Annie E. Casey KIDS COUNT® Data Center reports the child poverty rate in Howard County at 21.3 percent.  

In Central Indiana, one in three families is financially unstable, meaning the family spends more than 30 percent of their household income on housing. This leaves very little for all the other expenses that a family incurs, not to mention any unforeseen financial expenses.  

Join us for this interactive presentation “In One Moment” to experience what it might be like to be a part of a family living in poverty. The simulation will help participants better understand the problems, issues and challenges that real families in Indiana face daily.  

During this event, attendees will discuss ways to address the needs of low-income families and how to become involved in the fight to help reduce poverty. Also learn about local programs and services available in the community as well as area resources and initiatives.

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Speakers

Austin Hooker

Title: Engagement Coordinator, United Way of Howard County

Austin fosters relationships with volunteers and donors in Howard and Tipton counties to strengthen communities.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC-Kaiser ACE Study, children who experience multiple adverse or traumatic childhood experiences, such as exposure to violence or negative family relationships, have the highest levels of risk for negative outcomes throughout life.  An increasing number of children are affected by past or current trauma that haunts their minds, dictates their behavior and sometimes leads to mental health diagnosis. To support these children in a meaningful way, youth workers must have an understanding of the impact that trauma can have on the children they serve. 

This presentation will address trauma, the forms it takes in children and youth, and practical applications for those who interact with children in a non-therapeutic setting. Attendees will: 

  • learn about trauma and its impact on development; 
  • understand adolescent behaviors in the context of trauma; 
  • learn about the ARC Model and its use; and 
  • understand what trauma-informed care consists of in youth programming. 

Partners

Speakers

Robin Donaldson

Title: Chief Operating Officer, Indiana Youth Services Association

Robin Donaldson has a master’s degree in counseling and social psychology and has been teaching psychology, human resource and youth development credentialing classes at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana since August 2001. She has been a licensed Mental Health Counselor and is a licensed foster parent

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To positively impact and serve the children and youth of our state, we must understand the issues and needs they face. Being familiar with the most recent data and research on child well-being helps leaders, policymakers, youth workers and advocates create positive change for youth.

Join us for State of the Child 2019 to learn about the top challenges for kids in Bartholomew County, and across Indiana, and what we can do to ensure all kids thrive. You will hear critical data from the 2019 Indiana KIDS COUNT® Data Book, as well as best practice research on successful approaches to key issues. Through a robust and data-driven presentation, you will be empowered with the information needed to inform policies, practices and decision-making that improve the health and well-being of Hoosier youth.

A certificate of attendance will be available to all attendees at the event.

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Speakers

Charlie Geier

Title: Impact, Data Solutions & Statewide Advocacy - Indiana Youth Institute

Charlie Geier provides both strategic and innovative leadership to maximize the positive impact on communities and the healthy well-being of youth. He leads the Impact and Data Solutions division, which provides critical data and resources to empower partners and peers and is also responsible for the organization’s work in statewide engagement and advocacy.

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Children born into low-income families face multiple barriers to success and tend to have worse outcomes than their more affluent peers on many cognitive, behavioral, emotional and health measures., Almost 22 percent of children in Washington County are in poverty, and according to the Indiana Department of Education, 49 percent of school-aged children in the county receive free or reduced-price lunches.

Join us for this event to learn about the effects of poverty on youth skill-building, behaviors and other characteristics that predict future academic and workplace success. The presentation will help increases awareness of the personal and systemic barriers created by growing up in poverty. Participants will also learn evidence-based strategies that they can apply in community- or school-based programs that are working to improve the life trajectory of low-income youth.

You are invited to bring your program or service information to share and to arrive early or stay after for additional networking time

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Speakers

Tracy Butler

Title: Director, College & Career Connections – Indiana Youth Institute

Tracy Butler leads IYI’s College and Career Connections effort to expand the capacity of adults who can help youth fulfill their potential with a postsecondary credential. Tracy has spent over 25 years serving youth-impacting organizations and is unwavering in her belief that every child deserves to feel loved and hopeful.

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Suicide has been the second-leading cause of death for young Hoosiers between the ages of 15 and 24 since 2009. According to the Indiana State Department of Health Youth Risk Behavior Study, one in five Indiana high school students seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year and one in six have made a plan for attempting suicide.

Working with youth who may be considering suicide can be difficult. In order to help, it is important to recognize the warning signs or signals of suicidal intentions. Information and education can empower all people, regardless of background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know.

Attend this training to become certified in the QPR – Question, Persuade, Refer – suicide prevention model. Like CPR, QPR is an emergency response to someone in crisis and can save lives. The QPR mission is to reduce suicidal behaviors and save lives by providing innovative, practical and proven suicide prevention training. This training will help attendees:

  • recognize someone at risk for suicide;
  • demonstrate increased knowledge of intervention skills; and
  • become familiar with referral services and how to refer someone.

Participants will receive a QPR training certificate.

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Jodi Alexander

Title: Early Childhood Manager - One Community One Family

Robin Kichler

Title: Early Childhood Coordinator - One Community One Family

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Suicide has been the second-leading cause of death for young Hoosiers between the ages of 15 and 24 since 2009. According to the Indiana State Department of Health Youth Risk Behavior Study, one in five Indiana high school students seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year and one in six have made a plan for attempting suicide.

During this presentation attendees will hear a mother’s experience and lessons learned after losing her son to suicide in 2018. Her story emphasizes the importance of reducing stigma around the issue of suicide. Then, Suicide Prevention Across Rush County (SPARC) will provide information on the prevalence of suicidality in Rush County and local suicide prevention resources and opportunities. SPARC Youth Voice representatives will share their story of bringing light to the issue of youth suicide in Rush County.

Working with youth who may be considering suicide can be difficult. Information and education can empower all people, regardless of background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know.

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Speakers

Cinnamon Miller-Duncil

Title: Wraparound Facilitator, Centerstone Kelly Sizemore, Suicide Prevention Across Rush County Representative SPARC Youth Voice Students

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Just a few minutes experiencing ostracism or rejection causes people to report a reduced sense of self-esteem, self-control, belonging and meaningful existence. In the United States, 28 percent of 12- to 18-year old students reported being bullied at school and one in 10 students drop out of school because of repeated bullying. Rejection can create surges of anger and aggression; correlations exist between peer rejection and higher rates of delinquency, arrest, violent behavior and substance abuse.

Join us for this screening of the film “REJECT,” followed by a facilitated discussion about the effects of rejection and ostracism, and ways to overcome and prevent violence and tragedy. The documentary film “REJECT” takes an in-depth look at the science of social rejection, with a solution-oriented focus on the roots of bullying behavior and violent behavior against the self or others.

The film aims to raise public consciousness about the serious and potentially lethal consequences of interpersonal rejection in its many forms—peer bullying, parental neglect (or abuse), race discrimination, and other forms of social rejection across all ages. The film screening is made possible by Purdue Extension of Dubois County.

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Marcia Parcell

Title: , Extension Educator, Health and Human Services, Purdue Extension Dearborn County

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Evidence indicates today that youth ages 8-18 are spending an average of almost 11 hours a day (including multi-tasking) linked into media and technology.  85-90 percent of middle school students have access to a mobile device.  Yet despite all the conveniences and access these trends provide, increasing evidence is suggesting that this tech culture is not supporting healthy physical, psychological, social and spiritual development.  Understanding how we got here and where we should go is critical for all.

Join us for this informative presentation and discussion about teens and technology. Attendees will:

  • learn about current trends of media/technology usage for youth and what factors guide their use;
  • understand the benefits and risks of media/technology for youth; and
  • gain practical, empirically-supported recommendations for encouraging responsible tech usage.

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Speakers

Jim Schroeder, Ph.D

Title: Pediatric Psychologist, Vice President of Psychology Department, Easterseals Rehabilitation Center

Jim Schroeder received a BS from Ball State University with a major in psychology and minors in social work and counseling psychology. He graduated with a PhD in clinical psychology from Saint Louis University in 2005. In addition to seeing youth with a wide range of backgrounds and psychological issues, he specializes in evaluating and working with children (and their families) diagnosed with autism spectrum, learning, sleep, attention-deficit, and other developmental issues.

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Implicit bias predicts and determines decisions and actions; it determines how we positively or negatively respond to the youth we serve. It is important to recognize that we all have biases; this is how we process and organize information, how we make sense of the world around us. This presentation will explore what implicit bias is, how it differs from overt bias and how to recognize it in yourself.

This session is designed to help attendees learn how they hold power through their roles in institutions and how they can create change to affect implicit bias. During this presentation, attendees will:

  • better understand implicit bias and be able to recognize their own bias;
  • learn specific ways to address their own implicit bias; and
  • identify actions their school or organization can take to address bias.

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Speakers

Clare Wildhack-Nolan

Title: Program Facilitator & Director of Social Justice Leadership Camp, Peace Learning Center

Clare Wildhack-Nolan has been a social justice educator for the past 18 years, working in non-profits as well as schools as a certified Secondary Social Studies teacher. Clare has her Masters in the Art of Teaching from National-Louis University and a B.A. in Cross-Cultural Interdisciplinary Studies from Antioch College.

Frankie Keesee

Title: , Field Trip Coordinator & Spanish Specialist, Peace Learning Center

Frankie Keesee is an experienced facilitator in the non-profit industry. Frankie has a Master of Science focused in conflict analysis and resolution from George Mason University – School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution and a Master of Arts (M.A.) focused in conflict resolution and Mediterranean security from the University