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About This Event

Children who experience multiple adverse or traumatic childhood experiences, such as exposure to violence or negative family relationships, have the highest levels of risk for negative outcomes throughout life. Nearly half (47.3%) of children in Indiana have experienced one or more Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). To support these children in a meaningful way, teachers and youth workers must have an understanding of the impact that trauma can have on the children they serve.  

This presentation will provide an understanding of ACEs and trauma, the stress response, and how such stressors can impact a child’s social, emotional, behavioral and cognitive development.  You will hear about multiple strategies that promote student resilience, which is the counterbalance to trauma and adversity. During this session you will learn to: 

  • define the effects of ACES and trauma in terms of the stress response; 
  • articulate the connection between trauma informed practices, social emotional learning, mental health, and academics in terms of brain development.; and 
  • identify at least three strategies you can implement immediately to promote resilience, and therefore, impact student social, emotional and cognitive development. 

Partners

Speakers

Christy Gauss, MSW

Title: School Mental Health Facilitator, Indiana School Mental Health Initiative – Indiana Institute on Disability and Community at Indiana University

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About This Event

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CDC-Kaiser ACE Study, children who experience multiple adverse or traumatic childhood experiences, such as exposure to violence or negative family relationships, have the highest levels of risk for negative outcomes throughout life. An increasing number of children are affected by past or current trauma that haunts their minds, dictates their behavior and sometimes leads to mental health diagnosis. To support these children in a meaningful way, youth workers must have an understanding of the impact that trauma can have on the children they serve. 

This presentation will address trauma, the forms it takes in children and youth, and practical applications for those who interact with children in a non-therapeutic setting. Attendees will: 

  • learn about trauma and its impact on development; 
  • understand adolescent behaviors in the context of trauma; 
  • learn about the ARC Model and its use; and 
  • understand what trauma-informed care consists of in youth programming

Partners

Speakers

Robin Donaldson

Title: Chief Operating Officer, Indiana Youth Services Association

Robin Donaldson has a master’s degree in counseling and social psychology and has been teaching psychology, human resource and youth development credentialing classes at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana since August 2001. She has been a licensed Mental Health Counselor and is a licensed foster parent. 

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This presentation will guide attendees through an introductory conversation about implicit bias and the role it plays in the decisions we make in our organizations and our lives. Implicit bias predicts and determines our decisions and actions; it determines how we positively or negatively respond to the youth we serve. It is important to recognize that we all have biases; this is how we process and organize information, how we make sense of the work around us.  

This session is designed to help you recognize biases and identify ways to actively work to minimize and eliminate decision making that contributes to disparities based on race, ethnicity, gender and geography in youth serving systems.  

During this presentation, you will: 

  • learn to define implicit bias in their own words;  
  • recognize the role that implicit bias can play in decision making; and  
  • understand how implicit bias can impact the juvenile justice system, mental health/addiction systems, and other youth serving systems and organizations. 

Speakers

Brenda Graves-Croom

Title: Cultural & Linguistic Competency Coordinator, Indiana System of Care – Division of Mental Health & Addictions

Brenda Graves-Croom majored in sociology and Spanish, receiving a Bachelor of Arts at Indiana University, and she is currently pursuing a Master of Social Work at Indiana University. Brenda develops and facilitates continuing education for workers and reaches out to engage families and youth with systems of care. 

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We live in a digital age where kids spend a lot of time online using social media, instant messaging, researching, shopping and more. While social media can be a powerful means of communication and information sharing, internet crimes and online bullying are increasing concerns. Children are being targeted by online predators at an alarming rate and cyberbullying is becoming increasingly more prevalent.  

This presentation will highlight the challenges that social media presents and how online experiences may lead to victimization such as cyberbullying, sexting, solicitation and extortion. Attendees will receive information on what parents and professionals working with children can do to ensure children use the internet safely. 

Partners

Speakers

Amanda Giddings

Title: Youth Educator, Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, Indiana State Police

Amanda holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and has many years of experience in social services, including mental health agencies and the Department of Child Services. 

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You are invited to attend the Indiana Youth Institute’s 2019 State of the Child presentation. Hear about the key data for Hoosier youth first-hand from IYI’s 2019 Indiana KIDS COUNT® Data Book.

Light refreshments will be served. You will not want to miss this opportunity!

Hosted by the United Way of Delaware County

and Ball State University’s Office of Community Engagement

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About This Event

You are invited to attend the Indiana Youth Institute’s 2019 State of the Child presentation. Hear about the key data for Hoosier youth first-hand from IYI’s 2019 Indiana KIDS COUNT® Data Book.

You will not want to miss this opportunity!

Sponsored by the Commission on Improving the Status of Children

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About This Event

Children who experience multiple adverse early experiences, such as prenatal exposure to substances and/or prenatal stress, exposure to violence, or negative family relationships, have the highest levels of risk for negative outcomes throughout life.  An increasing number of children are affected by past or current exposures and events that can affect their behavior and sometimes lead to mental health diagnosis.

In order to support these children in a meaningful way, youth workers must have an understanding of the impact that such exposures can have on the children they serve. This presentation will address prenatal exposure to smoking, prenatal stress, early childhood experiences and their impact on later behavioral and mental health outcomes in youth. We will also discuss simple health and wellness techniques that can aid in building resilience against the negative influence of early adversity.

Attendees will gain a better understanding of:

  • how early experiences can affect physiology;
  • behavioral and mental health outcomes associated with early adversity; and
  • simple mental health and wellness techniques that can be used to by youth workers to help to equip youth with tools to enhance their lives and thrive.

Partners

Speakers

Ben & Maxine Miller

Title: Professor of Human Development and Family Studies – Purdue University

Valerie S. Knopik, Ph.D.,

Title:

Event Resources

Event Details:

About This Event

We live in a digital age where kids spend a lot of time online using social media, instant messaging, researching, shopping and more. While social media can be a powerful means of communication and information sharing, internet crimes and online bullying are increasing concerns. Children are being targeted by online predators at an alarming rate and cyberbullying is becoming increasingly more prevalent.  

 

This presentation will highlight the challenges that social media presents and how online experiences may lead to victimization such as cyberbullying, sexting, solicitation and extortion. Attendees will receive information on what parents and professionals working with children can do to ensure children use the internet safely.

Partners

Speakers

Amanda Giddings

Title: Youth Educator, Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, Indiana State Police

Amanda holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and has many years of experience in social services, including mental health agencies and the Department of Child Services.

Event Resources

Event Details:

About This Event

We live in a digital age where kids spend a lot of time online using social media, instant messaging, researching, shopping and more. While social media can be a powerful means of communication and information sharing, internet crimes and online bullying are increasing concerns. Children are being targeted by online predators at an alarming rate and cyberbullying is becoming increasingly more prevalent.  

 

This presentation will highlight the challenges that social media presents and how online experiences may lead to victimization such as cyberbullying, sexting, solicitation and extortion. Attendees will receive information on what parents and professionals working with children can do to ensure children use the internet safely.

Partners

Speakers

Cathy Bledsoe

Title: Youth Educator, Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, Indiana State Police

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