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To positively impact and serve the children and youth of our state, we must understand the issues and needs they face. Being familiar with the most recent data and research on child well-being helps leaders, policymakers, youth workers and advocates create positive change for youth.  

Join us to learn about the top challenges for kids in Jay County, and across Indiana, and what we can do to ensure all kids thrive. You will hear critical data from the 2019 Indiana KIDS COUNT® Data Book, as well as best practice research on successful approaches to key issues.  

Through a robust and data-driven presentation, you will be empowered with the information needed to inform policies, practices and decision-making that improve the health and well-being of Hoosier youth.  

Partners

Speakers

Corey Sims

Title: Data and Research Manager – Indiana Youth Institute 

Corey Sims serves individuals and organizations by providing access to critical data, research and best practices with a keen focus on quality service, accessibility, collaboration, and empowerment. Corey is a National Guard Veteran, Butler alumni, and father to his daughter, Keira. He believes in the power of scientific advancement across all communities. 

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Suicide has been the second-leading cause of death for young Hoosiers between the ages of 15 and 24 since 2009. According to the Indiana State Department of Health Youth Risk Behavior Study, one in five Indiana high school students seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year and one in six have made a plan for attempting suicide.  

Working with youth who may be considering suicide can be difficult. In order to help, it is important to recognize the warning signs or signals of suicidal intentions. Information and education can empower all people, regardless of background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know. 

Attend this training to become certified in the QPR – Question, Persuade, Refer – suicide prevention model. Like CPR, QPR is an emergency response to someone in crisis and can save lives. The QPR mission is to reduce suicidal behaviors and save lives by providing innovative, practical and proven suicide prevention training. This training will help you 

  • recognize someone at risk for suicide 
  • demonstrate increased knowledge of intervention skills; and  
  • become familiar with referral services and how to refer someone 

 

Participants will receive a QPR training certificate. 

Speakers

Jodi Alexander

Title: Early Childhood Manager

One Community One Family

Robin Kichler

Title: Early Childhood Coordinator

One Community One Family

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About This Event

Suicide has been the second-leading cause of death for young Hoosiers between the ages of 15 and 24 since 2009. According to the Indiana State Department of Health Youth Risk Behavior Study, one in five Indiana high school students seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year and one in six have made a plan for attempting suicide.  

Working with youth who may be considering suicide can be difficult. In order to help, it is important to recognize the warning signs or signals of suicidal intentions. Information and education can empower all people, regardless of background, to make a positive difference in the life of someone they know. 

Attend this Talk Saves Lives™ community-based presentation to learn more about suicide, the research on prevention and what we can do to fight suicide. This workshop will help you learn more about suicide statistics, who it affects, the risk and warning signs of suicide, and what can be done individually and as a community to prevent it.

Partners

Speakers

Nancy Smith

Title: American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Anderson “Out of the Darkness” Walk Chair

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According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, high-quality early childhood care and education prepares children for long-term educational success in elementary school, middle school and high school. Among Hoosier children younger than six years, 68.3% have all parents in the labor force and likely need some form of care. The Indiana Early Learning Advisory Committee reports that only 16% of children likely in need of care are enrolled in a high-quality program. 

Providing children with high-quality early learning increases readiness for school and the work world, and businesses benefit by having parents more fully present in their work. Investing in early learning can provide long-term benefits for children, families and communities, socially and financially. 

Join us for this presentation and discussion to better understand: 

  • the short and long-term benefits of early brain development;  
  • the connection between high-quality childcare and high-quality workforce; and 
  • how to involve business and community sectors in improving childcare options to broaden early learning opportunities for all families. 

Speakers

Jeri McCorkle

Title: Coordinator, First5

Jeri McCorkle is working to increase local understanding of early brain development. The First5 coalition is also studying Rush County’s SWOT to determine where to best focus the community’s energy and efforts. Jeri has over 25 years of experience as an elementary educator and is passionate about helping her community thrive both now and in the future. 

Event Details:

About This Event

To positively impact and serve the children and youth of our state, we must understand the issues and needs they face. Being familiar with the most recent data and research on child well-being helps leaders, policymakers, youth workers and advocates create positive change for youth.  

Join us to learn about the top challenges for kids in Decatur County, and across Indiana, and what we can do to ensure all kids thrive. You will hear critical data from the 2019 Indiana KIDS COUNT® Data Book, as well as best practice research on successful approaches to key issues.  

Through a robust and data-driven presentation, you will be empowered with the information needed to inform policies, practices and decision-making that improve the health and well-being of Hoosier youth.  

You are encouraged to bring a personal laptop or tablet for hands-on experience learning to search and navigate the KIDS COUNT Data Center and other resources to incorporate data in presentations, proposals and everyday work. Wi-fi will be available. 

Partners

Speakers

Indiana Youth Institute

Title: Impact & Data Solutions Team and Strategic Engagement Team

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Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental disability that affects a person’s ability to communicate and interact with others. Autism is known as a “spectrum disorder,” meaning that although it is defined by a certain set of behaviors, children and adults with autism can exhibit any combination of these behaviors in any degree of severity.  

An estimated one in 68 American youth have been diagnosed with ASD. Join us for this important presentation by the Autism Society of Indiana to learn more about: 

  • the basic characteristics and symptoms that define autism; 
  • early warning signs, behaviors and the importance of early screening; and 
  • available therapies and treatments as well as tips and tricks to help someone on the spectrum. 

Attendees will hear personal testimony about the impact of autism on families and learn about local resources available in the community. There will also be an opportunity for Q&A. 

Partners

Speakers

Rachel Deaton

Title: Autism Ally – Autism Society of Indiana

The mission of Autism Society of Indiana is to improve the lives of all people affected by autism in Indiana. Through statewide Autism Allies, ASI works to provide support, resources, trainings and information to families, individuals and community members.

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Just a few minutes experiencing ostracism or rejection causes people to report a reduced sense of self-esteem, self-control, belonging and meaningful existence. In the United States, 28 percent of 12- to 18-year old students reported being bullied at school and one in 10 students drop out of school because of repeated bullying. Rejection can create surges of anger and aggression; correlations exist between peer rejection and higher rates of delinquency, arrest, violent behavior and substance abuse. 

Join us for this screening of the film “REJECT,” followed by a facilitated discussion about the effects of rejection and ostracism, and ways to overcome and prevent violence and tragedy. The documentary film “REJECT” takes an in-depth look at the science of social rejection, with a solution-oriented focus on the roots of bullying behavior and violent behavior against the self or others.  

The film aims to raise public consciousness about the serious and potentially lethal consequences of interpersonal rejection in its many forms—peer bullying, parental neglect (or abuse), race discrimination, and other forms of social rejection across all ages. The film screening is made possible by Purdue Extension of Dubois County

Speakers

Cheri Brown

Title: Extension Educator, Health and Human Services, Purdue Extension Blackford County

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Children who experience multiple adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), such as exposure to violence or negative family relationships, have a greater likelihood of negative outcomes throughout life. The CDC-Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study is one of the largest investigations of childhood abuse and neglect and later-life health and well-being. 

The findings of the ACE Study show that leading causes of health, learning, behavior and productivity problems are often rooted in the cumulative impacts of childhood adversity. During this presentation, you will learn about the impact of ACEs and how building resilience can help people recover and thrive in spite of adversity. You will: 

  • better understand the ACE study and its importance; 
  • discover how ACEs impact individuals and their health outcomes; and 
  • identify how to begin addressing ACEs with the youth and families they serve. 

Partners

Speakers

Skye Berger

Title: Chief Encouragement Officer & Executive Creative Coach – Door Opener Academy, Skye Berger Group

Skye has more than ten years of experience as a consultant, coach, speaker and trainer. Her background includes child welfare and mental health facilitation and program development. Skye has reached youth and families nationwide through keynote presentations and training on leadership, renewal, teen parenting and transition-age youth. 

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Human trafficking is the fastest growing and tied as the second largest criminal industry worldwide, generating an $150.2 billion each year. Trafficking and exploitation can be found in communities of all kinds. In 2016, the Indiana State Police investigated more than 178 incidents of trafficked or exploited youth, with victims first trafficked as young as age seven.  

By reframing and humanizing an issue that is often sensationalized and stigmatized, we can begin to understand how human trafficking impacts our youth and families. This interactive presentation will help create a clearer vision of what human trafficking may look like in our communities. Attendees will: 

  • understand the definitions of human trafficking under federal and state law; 
  • recognize risk factors that make youth vulnerable to being exploited, as well as what makes them less likely to identify as a victim and less likely to leave a trafficking situation; 
  • be able to identify victims and how to report a suspected case; and 
  • learn what intervention and victim services are available locally, regionally and statewide. 

Partners

Speakers

Jeremy Greenlee, MA

Title: Region 3 Coalition Coordinator – Indiana Trafficking Victim Assistance Program (ITVAP)

The ITVAP program works in collaboration with law enforcement, Department of Child Services and other service providers to help children escape sex and labor trafficking and support them in recovery and healing.

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We live in a digital age where kids spend a lot of time online using social media, instant messaging, researching, shopping and more. While social media can be a powerful means of communication and information sharing, internet crimes and online bullying are increasing concerns. Children are being targeted by online predators at an alarming rate and cyberbullying is becoming increasingly more prevalent.  

This presentation will highlight the challenges that social media presents and how online experiences may lead to victimization such as cyberbullying, sexting, solicitation and extortion. Attendees will receive information on what parents and professionals working with children can do to ensure children use the internet safely. 

Partners

Speakers

Amanda Giddings

Title: Youth Educator, Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, Indiana State Police

Amanda holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology and has many years of experience in social services, including mental health agencies and the Department of Child Services. 

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