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In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we are highlighting the growing number of Hispanic children in our state while sharing with youth workers – teachers, after-school providers, coaches, mentors and families – how they can join in the celebration.  

History of Hispanic Heritage month: 

  • Takes place every year from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15  
  • Started in 1968 as a time to recognize and celebrate the many contributions, diverse cultures and extensive histories of Americans who came from — or whose ancestors came from — Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. 
  • Started during President Lyndon Johnson’s term as a 1-week celebration and was extended to a month during President Ronald Reagan’s term in 1988. 

Indiana’s Hispanic youth population and national trends: 

  • Indiana’s child population has increased in racial and ethnic diversity over the past 10 years and is more diverse than the adult population (children = 27.3% race or ethnicity other than white, non-Hispanic vs 18% of adults race or ethnicity other than white, non-Hispanic). 
  • The Hispanic population has seen the largest demographic increase over the past 10 years (+2.5%).  
  • The Indiana Hispanic youth population has increased to 11.3% (2018), up from 8.8% in 2008.  
  • Between 2014 and 2018, the population of Indiana Hispanic youth ages 0-17 increased from 165,610 to 176,634. The Hispanic youth population has increased between 2,000 to 3,000 each year since 2014.  
  • Indiana’s Hispanic youth population (176,634) is third largest among neighboring states and 21st largest nationally. Among Indiana’s neighboring states, Illinois boasts the largest Hispanic youth population (710,873), followed by Michigan (182,786).   

According to research conducted by Pew Research Center, by 2035, one-third of American children and youth will be Latino. U.S.-born people, rather than immigrants, are driving the Latino population shift.

The U.S. Department of Education, Smithsonian Education and the National Education Association have easy to use lessons, student activities, quizzes and media/videos that can be used to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage month. Resources are organized by grade level and cover topics such as:   

  • Hispanic history and leaders – help students learn about famous Hispanic Americans, from early settlers to scientists, athletes, musicians and civic leaders.    
  • Comparing cultural holidays  students in grades K-4 compare Halloween and El Día de los Muertos by looking at traditions, music and visual art.  
  • Journal of Time  Students in grades 5-8 use photographs as inspiration to write journal entries from the point of view of someone living during the Great Depression in California.
  • Common Visions, Common Voices  students in grades 9-12 analyze similarities and differences between cultures by investigating themes and motifs found in literature or visual arts.  

Local and state organizations, such as the Indiana Latino Institute, the Indiana Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs, La Plaza Indianapolis and Girl Scouts, provide programs, events and materials that celebrate this month and Indiana’s Hispanic children and families.     

National Hispanic Heritage month is a great reminder that there is more we can learn about American history while also reminding us that we can do more to engage this growing student population. Some recommended actions for youth-serving professionals include:  

  • Tell students that they can succeed, and reinforce with new English speakers that they can overcome language barriers. 
  • Recognize that seemingly little things, like making positive comments or taking the time to discuss a student’s work, can go a long way toward building connections and confidence. 
  • Help kids start thinking about and preparing for college very early. Do not be dismissive by assuming students do not want to go to college or graduate. Far too many Latino students have heard that they are not ready for college. 
  • Continue and expand the work many school districts are already doing to increase their cultural awareness, including both training and ongoing professional education. 
  • Expand engagement strategies involving Latino parents and extended family members as partners in their child’s development and success.  

Indiana and American classrooms, afterschool programs, teams and clubs are becoming increasingly diverse. National Hispanic Heritage month is a great way to celebrate Indiana’s fastest growing group of children and youth. Hopefully, the events and actions taken this month will increase our ability to learn and build on the rich array of cultural and community norms of students and their families. After all, the better we understand our students, the better we can support and champion their success.  

Tami Silverman is the president & CEO of Indiana Youth Institute. She may be reached at iyi@iyi.org or on Twitter at @Tami_IYI.